spacettf:

NGC6960, the Veil nebula by Trois_Merlettes on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Despite the nearly full moon, I could not resist testing my improved resolution on the intricate lace work of the Veil Nebula using narrow band filters. This is a remnant of a supernova explosion which occurred some 6 to 8 thousands years ago.
Here red is set to Halpha (Hydrogen), Green to SII (Sulfur) and Blue to OIII (Oxygen).
C11-HD with x0.7 reduction, STLX11002m.
Total exposure 6h10’ all binned 1x1; FWHM ~ 2.5
9x600s in Ha
9x600s in OIII
19x600s in SII

spacettf:

NGC6960, the Veil nebula by Trois_Merlettes on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Despite the nearly full moon, I could not resist testing my improved resolution on the intricate lace work of the Veil Nebula using narrow band filters. This is a remnant of a supernova explosion which occurred some 6 to 8 thousands years ago.
Here red is set to Halpha (Hydrogen), Green to SII (Sulfur) and Blue to OIII (Oxygen).
C11-HD with x0.7 reduction, STLX11002m.
Total exposure 6h10’ all binned 1x1; FWHM ~ 2.5
9x600s in Ha
9x600s in OIII
19x600s in SII

87 notes

amnhnyc:

On July 20, 1969, with 600 million people watching on TV, an American crew landed on the Moon—the first people ever to walk on another world. The Apollo 11 mission had three crew members: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, who piloted the craft that would return them to Earth, while the others became the first two men ever to walk its surface.

Learn more about this historic event

3,653 notes

mapsontheweb:

Countries that prefer instant coffee over fresh-brewed

mapsontheweb:

Countries that prefer instant coffee over fresh-brewed

284 notes

spacettf:

W1754903141 by ugordan on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Cassini WAC RGB view of crescent Saturn with Titan in the distance.

spacettf:

W1754903141 by ugordan on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Cassini WAC RGB view of crescent Saturn with Titan in the distance.

127 notes

earthstory:

This weekend marks the 45th anniversary of the first humans walking on the Moon, the Apollo 11 mission. Here’s one of the images from that mission in gif form; the famous Earthrise, as seen from the Command Module spacecraft that remained in Lunar Orbit while 2 astronauts descended to the surface.

earthstory:

This weekend marks the 45th anniversary of the first humans walking on the Moon, the Apollo 11 mission. Here’s one of the images from that mission in gif form; the famous Earthrise, as seen from the Command Module spacecraft that remained in Lunar Orbit while 2 astronauts descended to the surface.

223 notes

framesandflames:

Rapatronic Photography of the Trinity Nuclear bomb Test

Photography which captures frames at 1/1,000,000th of a second. showing the evolution of atomic energy though the first milliseconds of the blast

12 notes

mapsontheweb:

USGS recently updated U.S. National Seismic Hazard Map

mapsontheweb:

USGS recently updated U.S. National Seismic Hazard Map

174 notes

usagov:

Image description: An American astronaut stands on the surface of the moon. July 20th is the anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the moon and Neil Armstrong saying the famous words, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”
See more photos of the Apollo 11 crew and this historic event.
Photo by NASA.

usagov:

Image description: An American astronaut stands on the surface of the moon. July 20th is the anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the moon and Neil Armstrong saying the famous words, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

See more photos of the Apollo 11 crew and this historic event.

Photo by NASA.

631 notes

thedemon-hauntedworld:


The space shuttle Discovery climbs toward Earth orbit following a successful liftoff from KSC’s Pad 39A at 8:41:50 a.m. (EDT), Aug. 30, 1984. Inside the spacecraft are six crewmembers looking forward to a busy week in space. The scene was photographed by astronaut John W. Young in the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA).  Photo credit: NASA

thedemon-hauntedworld:

The space shuttle Discovery climbs toward Earth orbit following a successful liftoff from KSC’s Pad 39A at 8:41:50 a.m. (EDT), Aug. 30, 1984. Inside the spacecraft are six crewmembers looking forward to a busy week in space. The scene was photographed by astronaut John W. Young in the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA).
Photo credit: NASA

492 notes

futurist-foresight:

Today we remember the first moonwalk on July 20 1969.

todaysdocument:

Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin make the first moonwalk, on July 20, 1969.

In these clips they can been seen planting the U.S. Flag on the lunar surface and experimenting with various types of movement in the Moon’s lower gravity, including loping strides and kangaroo hops.

Moonwalk One, ca. 1970

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, 1962 - 1981. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

via Media Matters » Stepping Stones to the Moon

2,855 notes

astronomicalwonders:

The Coyote Head Nebula
When searching for the nicest nebulae in the sky it’s nice when your friends help you out. This striking star formation region, mapped in infrared light by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, was recently spotted by one of Spitzer’s Twitter followers searching through the GLIMPSE360 panorama of our Milky Way galaxy.
One of multitudes of star-forming nebulas scattered across the sky, this area had been a bit of a “dirty” secret, tucked away behind a veil of dust that blocks our view in visible light. That obscuring veil fades away under Spitzer’s infrared gaze revealing a collection of young stars bursting out of the dusty gas clouds in which they formed. Astronomers identify this area only by a collection of catalog numbers like IRAS 15541-5349.
Credit: NASA/Spitzer

astronomicalwonders:

The Coyote Head Nebula

When searching for the nicest nebulae in the sky it’s nice when your friends help you out. This striking star formation region, mapped in infrared light by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, was recently spotted by one of Spitzer’s Twitter followers searching through the GLIMPSE360 panorama of our Milky Way galaxy.

One of multitudes of star-forming nebulas scattered across the sky, this area had been a bit of a “dirty” secret, tucked away behind a veil of dust that blocks our view in visible light. That obscuring veil fades away under Spitzer’s infrared gaze revealing a collection of young stars bursting out of the dusty gas clouds in which they formed. Astronomers identify this area only by a collection of catalog numbers like IRAS 15541-5349.

Credit: NASA/Spitzer

1,159 notes