spacettf:

Strong Shortwave in the Pacific Northwest, and Possible Severe Weather by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.Via Flickr:
A strong shortwave is moving through the Pacific Northwest today, June 6, 2012 and was captured at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT/7:45 a.m. EDT) by NOAA’s GOES-15 satellite and is expected to bring severe weather with it.
The GOES-15 satellite sits in a fixed position over the western U.S. and provides continuous visible and infrared images of the weather in that half of the U.S. Because it sits in a fixed position, it’s a geostationary satellite. The image was created at NASA’s GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
The shortwave trough (elongated area) of low pressure is bringing a lot of power with it to the Pacific Northwest.  In the image, the leading edge of the cloud cover associated with it is over Washington state and Oregon and moving east. The National Weather Service noted that severe storms are possible today from eastern Washington state and northeastern Oregon, north and central Idaho and western and central Montana.  The National Weather Service national weather summary for June 6 noted “Storms should develop over the higher terrain of eastern Oregon and west-central Idahobefore moving quickly north-northeastward across eastern Washington and northwestern Idaho near and ahead of the front attendant to the shortwave trough. Supercells and bowing line segments likely evolving through the late afternoon into the evening.” As with severe thunderstorms, tornadoes are also a possibility.
Meanwhile, rain and storms will blanket the entire Pacific Northwest today from this system.
Image: NASA GOES Project; Text: NASA, Rob Gutro

spacettf:

Strong Shortwave in the Pacific Northwest, and Possible Severe Weather by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A strong shortwave is moving through the Pacific Northwest today, June 6, 2012 and was captured at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT/7:45 a.m. EDT) by NOAA’s GOES-15 satellite and is expected to bring severe weather with it.

The GOES-15 satellite sits in a fixed position over the western U.S. and provides continuous visible and infrared images of the weather in that half of the U.S. Because it sits in a fixed position, it’s a geostationary satellite. The image was created at NASA’s GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

The shortwave trough (elongated area) of low pressure is bringing a lot of power with it to the Pacific Northwest. In the image, the leading edge of the cloud cover associated with it is over Washington state and Oregon and moving east. The National Weather Service noted that severe storms are possible today from eastern Washington state and northeastern Oregon, north and central Idaho and western and central Montana. The National Weather Service national weather summary for June 6 noted “Storms should develop over the higher terrain of eastern Oregon and west-central Idahobefore moving quickly north-northeastward across eastern Washington and northwestern Idaho near and ahead of the front attendant to the shortwave trough. Supercells and bowing line segments likely evolving through the late afternoon into the evening.” As with severe thunderstorms, tornadoes are also a possibility.

Meanwhile, rain and storms will blanket the entire Pacific Northwest today from this system.

Image: NASA GOES Project; Text: NASA, Rob Gutro

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